Chile’s Astronomical Marvel Nears Completion

The Advancements of Astronomy: The Magnificent Extremely Large Telescope

Discovering the Cosmos: The Extraordinary Extremely Large Telescope (ELT)

Set atop Chile’s Cerro Armazones, the construction of the Extremely Large Telescope (ELT) is expanding the frontier of space exploration. This colossal optical telescope, with its 39-meter primary mirror, is poised to provide images with a precision 16 times superior to the Hubble Space Telescope, ushering in a new era for ground-based astronomy.

Unveiling the Mysteries of the Universe

Rising 3046 meters above sea level, the ELT stands as a testament to human ambition and scientific inquisitiveness. Astronomers worldwide eagerly anticipate capturing the clearest images of the universe yet, enabling them to study distant exoplanets, nebulae, and trace the origins of the earliest galaxies. Despite unforeseen delays caused by the Covid-19 pandemic, the project has made significant progress. Technical first light is scheduled for the beginning of 2028, followed by an intensive commissioning phase.

A Global Endeavor of Collaboration and Innovation

The mirror segments of the ELT are the result of global expertise, meticulously crafted by the German company Schott and polished by Safran Reosc in France. Currently, eighteen of the 798 mirror segments are en route to the arid expanses of the Atacama Desert. Luis Chavarria Garrido, ESO’s representative in Chile, emphasizes the complexity of constructing such colossal observation instruments, hinting at the potential for even larger telescopes in the future.

Engineering Wonders

The ELT’s dome, an engineering marvel in its own right, weighs an astonishing 6000 tons, yet it is designed to move with utmost precision. This remarkable achievement builds upon the legacy of the Very Large Telescope (VLT) and represents a quantum leap in astronomical engineering. The integration of artificial intelligence holds the promise of streamlining maintenance and operations, ensuring the ELT operates at peak efficiency.

With the global astronomical community eagerly awaiting the completion of the ELT, the answers it may provide to longstanding cosmic enigmas could pave the way for the next revolutionary leap in telescope technology.

Olalekan Adigun


Olalekan Adigun, a seasoned journalist and editor with a rich legacy in digital journalism, hails from the vibrant heart of Africa. His passion for the written word shines through as he navigates the complexities of modern-day reportage. Prior to joining BNN, Olalekan honed his craft across various news platforms, accumulating a wealth of experience and insights. His unwavering commitment to journalistic pursuits makes him a formidable voice in the ever-evolving media landscape.




In the realm of astronomy, a groundbreaking milestone is being achieved with the construction of the Extremely Large Telescope (ELT) on Chile’s Cerro Armazones. This marvel of engineering, boasting a primary mirror of 39 meters, is set to revolutionize ground-based astronomy by providing images 16 times more precise than the renowned Hubble Space Telescope.

Perched at an altitude of 3046 meters, the ELT represents humanity’s relentless pursuit of scientific knowledge and exploration. Scientists worldwide eagerly anticipate the remarkable clarity it will offer, enabling them to delve into the mysteries of distant exoplanets, nebulae, and even the earliest galaxies. Despite the challenges posed by the Covid-19 pandemic, significant progress has been made, and the ELT is expected to achieve technical first light by early 2028, followed by an intensive commissioning phase.

The creation of the ELT is a testament to global collaboration and innovation. Its mirror segments are the result of meticulous craftsmanship from renowned companies such as Germany’s Schott and France’s Safran Reosc. Currently, eighteen of the 798 mirror segments are en route to the arid Atacama Desert. ESO’s representative in Chile, Luis Chavarria Garrido, highlights the complexity involved in constructing such colossal observation instruments and hints at the possibility of even larger telescopes in the future.

Beyond its scientific prowess, the ELT stands as an engineering marvel. Its dome, weighing a staggering 6000 tons, defies expectations by moving with unparalleled precision. This achievement builds upon the success of the Very Large Telescope (VLT) and represents a remarkable leap in astronomical engineering. Additionally, the integration of artificial intelligence promises to streamline maintenance and operations, ensuring the ELT operates at maximum efficiency.

As the global astronomical community eagerly awaits the completion of the ELT, its potential to unravel longstanding cosmic mysteries is unparalleled. The insights gained from this groundbreaking telescope could pave the way for the next paradigm-shifting advancement in telescope technology.

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Author Bio: Olalekan Adigun is a highly experienced journalist and editor with a distinguished career in digital journalism. Originating from the vibrant heart of Africa, his passion for the written word shines through as he navigates the complexities of modern-day reportage. Prior to joining BNN, Olalekan honed his craft across various news platforms, amassing a wealth of experience and insights. His unwavering commitment to journalistic pursuits makes him a formidable voice in the ever-evolving media landscape.



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